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What To Wear For Success: How To Advance Your Career With Personal Style

Updated: Jul 20

When it comes to advancing your career, personal style can be a powerful tool.


I'm a firm believer in putting the best version of ourselves out to the world - this means dressing for success and projecting a confident image.


But what does this look like in the real world? And how can you make the most of your personal style to advance your career?


For this article, I speak to two ambitious female leaders who share their experience of how investing in their personal style changed their careers - and their lives. Keep reading to find out how you can do it too.



Dress With Intention & Purpose


Whether you’re presenting to the board, reporting to your boss, or going for a promotion, the visuals you present – from your body language to your personal style language – are a vital part of how others perceive you.


In research conducted by Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, they suggest that colleagues size up your competence, likability

and trustworthiness in 250 milliseconds – simply based on appearance.


While talent, hard work and competence are important for career success, so too is your personal brand and presence - and part of that is how you look.


Sarah Felice, a Career and Executive Coach who specialises in working with senior female executives, says it's vital that your brand image aligns with expectations.


"When someone meets you after reading about you in your resume or LinkedIn profile, your brand needs to be congruent with what they expect. You should already look and sound like the job you are going for. " Sarah said.

For Hannah, a banking Director who came to see me for a personal brand makeover, clothes offer an additional opportunity to positively impact your audience.


"I fully believe that a woman’s experience, credentials and merits are important to our career journeys, but why miss or ignore the opportunity to further ensure our success by presenting ourselves in a way that makes us memorable and impactful."




What you wear immediately communicates what you stand for, and how successful you appear to others. We also tend to have greater confidence in people that dress well and look the part.


In short, if you want to move up the career ladder, you need to start dressing in a way that reflects what you want others to think about you.


"I now dress with intention every day, whether it’s internal meetings or client facing, face-to-face or virtual. I present myself with purpose and try not to miss out on any opportunities to make an impression" said Hannah.



You Can Perform Better When You Dress Well


While we know that clothing affects how others perceive us, an even greater reason why what you wear matters is how it affects how you feel about yourself.


"We do better when we look better because we feel better." Rachel Roy

Vanessa, a Senior Executive with a renowned global technology company, knows first hand how important it is to be confident in yourself.



"Working on my personal style means I now feel super confident to lead without fear that I'm not going to look the part. I had to walk on stage in front of 300 people last month and I felt super confident to do that. I've got my colour palette, I know my brand and style, I've got the outfits that represent me."



For women, confidence in the workplace is critical and the clothes you wear can make all the difference in how you feel about yourself.


Your clothing creates feeling.


The connection between what we wear and how we think, feel and act is referred to as 'enclothed cognition'.


That means there are proven psychological benefits that your style and clothing can provide, and you can perform better based on what you wear.


Sounds too good to be true? Try putting on a snazzier outfit and see how different you feel. It could be as simple as stepping out of the basic black dress into a brighter, bolder colour.


When Vanessa first came to me, her wardrobe was predominantly monochrome. Yet a Signature Colour Analysis helped us uncover her rich and earthy Warm Autumn palette, working through her best neutrals and signature colours.


"The process of doing the colours blew my mind and it gave me the confidence and ability to stop buying black and navy, which didn't suit me anyway" said Vanessa.


Black can often feel like a 'safe' purchase, but its rarely memorable and won't help you to feel seen.


If, like Vanessa, you have styles or colours in your wardrobe that aren't serving you, it's time to for an upgrade.


If you'd like to talk with me about your current style situation and how I might be able to help, book in a call with me here.


Find Your Sweet Spot


This is the place where your authentic style personality, your environment and the way you'd like to be perceived intersects. When I first worked with Vanessa , she was working in a traditional corporate environment, so well tailored blazers, dresses and skirts were the perfect pieces to build her wardrobe around.


When she moved to her new role in a technology company, her working environment was vastly different. Traditional corporate wear would simply look out of place. Instead, we selected a range of smart casual pieces that could be mixed and matched, and which showcased her uniqueness. We added some smart sneakers, designer tees and bolder jewellery.



Now in a senior leadership role, she said: "As a leader I feel that blending into the background is not an option. You have to lead from the front. And to lead from the front, you've got to feel really good in your own skin, and because I'm feeling good in what I wear all the time, I'm a more present leader."


Hannah on the other hand had a 'dress for your day' workplace dress code in a banking environment, so we needed to ensure she had a range of smart casual and more formal pieces. I worked with Hannah to help her understand how she could tailor her style for specific audiences on any given day to have a desired and memorable impact.



Shift Your Mindset

So how you can dress for success?